Articles

MWE written articles.

Multistate Resident? Watch Out for Double Taxation

Contrary to popular belief, no federal law prohibits multiple states from collecting tax on the same income. This article raises some important points to keep in mind for those who maintain residences in more than one state (or may soon do so). We’ll also look at some ways an individual can establish domicile in a new state.

Domicile vs. ResidenceHow to Establish Domicile - Multistate Resident? Watch Out for Double Taxation

Generally, if you’re “domiciled” in a state, you’re subject to that state’s income tax on your worldwide income. Your domicile isn’t necessarily where you spend most of your time. Rather, it’s the location of your “true, fixed, permanent home” or the place “to which you intend to return whenever absent.” Your domicile doesn’t change — even if you spend little or no time there — until you establish domicile elsewhere.

Residence, on the other hand, is based on the amount of time you spend in a state. You’re a resident if you have a “permanent place of abode” in a state and spend a minimum amount of time there — for example, at least 183 days per year. Many states impose their income taxes on residents’ worldwide income even if they’re domiciled in another state.

Potential Solution

Suppose you live in State A and work in State B. Given the length of your commute, you keep an apartment in State B near your office. You return to your home in State A only on weekends.

State A taxes you as a domiciliary, while State B taxes you as a resident. Neither state offers a credit for taxes paid to another state, so your income is taxed twice.

One possible solution to such double taxation is to avoid maintaining a permanent place of abode in State B. However, State B may still have the power to tax your income from the job in State B because it’s derived from a source within the state. Yet State B wouldn’t be able to tax your income from other sources, such as investments you made in State A.

Minimize Unnecessary Taxes

This example illustrates just one way double taxation can arise when you divide your time between two or more states. Your tax advisor can research applicable state law and identify ways to minimize exposure to unnecessary taxes.

©2019

Contact Us
reCAPTCHA
Sending
Long Island

400 Garden City Plaza, Fifth Floor, Garden City, NY 11530
T 516.747.2000 // F 516.747.6707

New York City

757 Third Avenue, Suite 2002, New York, NY 10017
T 212.973.1000 // F 212.973.1004

Grand Cayman

27 Hospital Road, Fifth Floor, P.O. Box 1748GT
George Town, Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands, B.W.I